Genetic interrelations among grain quality indicators and agronomic traits for oat uri icon

abstract

  • Test weight, seed weight, and groat percentage are three common measures of grain quality for oat (Avena sativa L.). There is considerable disagreement, however, about the utility of each of these traits as measures of grain quality, so it is important to understand the genetic interrelations among them and between them and other agronomic traits. In this study, 50 random F2-derived F3 lines from each of 13 biparental oat crosses were evaluated. Genotypic variances, heritabilities, and genotypic correlations for test weight (TW), seed weight (SW), groat percentage (GP), grain yield (GY), harvest index (HI), plant height (PH), and date of heading (DH) were used to predict and compare direct and indirect gains from single-trait selection. Direct selection was always the most effective method for improving single traits; average predicted improvement of population means was 4% for TW, 10% for SW, 1% for GP, and 14% for GY when 10% selection intensity was applied. Genotypic correlation coefficients, averaged for all crosses, were 0.04 for TW with SW, 0.37 for TW with GP, -0.09 for SW with GP, and 0.29, 0.36, and 0.30 for GY with TW, SW, and GP, respectively. Thus, direct selection for TW, SW, or GP should not greatly affect the other two grain quality indicators. For the seven traits considered, there seemed to be no large advantage or disadvantage, in terms of correlated responses, associated with selection for any of the grain quality indicators.

publication date

  • 1992
  • 1992