Variation in growth, wood density and carbon concentration in five tree and shrub species in Niger uri icon

abstract

  • There is little information about variation in growth, wood density and carbon concentration in native tree and shrub species in Africa. This information is needed to make realistic projections about carbon sequestration of different species in different environments. Farmers manage natural regeneration of many native species in the drylands of Niger, so there is interest in carbon sequestration potential of the species. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) if tree height, stem diameter, mean ring width, wood density and carbon concentration differ among five tree and shrub species (Combretum glutinosum, Combretum micranthum, Combretum nigricans, Guiera senegalensis, Piliostigma reticulatum) in Niger; (2) if variation within species is affected by land use type (parkland agroforests, woodlands), soil type (sandy, rocky), terrain type (temporarily flooded, flat, hill slope) and mean annual rainfall; and (3) if growth variables, wood density and carbon concentration are correlated in the five species. Environmental variables did not have strong effects on growth and wood variables of the species, and some effects differed among species. Height across species increased with mean annual rainfall. Stem diameter and mean ring width across species were greater in parkland agroforests than in woodlands. Carbon concentration was positively correlated with growth variables of four species, but was not correlated with wood density in most species. Correlations between wood density and growth differed in sign among some species. We conclude that above-ground carbon sequestration per tree probably increases with mean annual rainfall and is greater in parkland agroforests than in woodlands. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media B.V

publication date

  • 2018