Effect and interaction of photoperiod, temperature, water stress and nitrogen on flowering and growth in jute uri icon

abstract

  • The effect of environmental factors other than photoperiod on flowering in jute has not been adequately documented. Such knowledge is necessary if control over the flowering process is to be attained. Thus a factorial experiment was conducted in which the main effects and interactions of three genotypes, three day/night temperature regimes, three photoperiods, two levels of water supply and two nitrogen levels were studied. The experiment was conducted in three compartments of a glasshouse in which temperature was manipulated by evaporative coolers and gas-fired heaters and daylength by artificial lighting and light-proof compartments.Photoperiod was the dominant factor controlling flowering, and hence growth habit. There was relatively little effect of temperature on flowering even though night temperatures below 20°C markedly delayed emergence and initial growth. Water stress applied during 35?40 days after germination delayed flowering but nitrogen treatment had no effect. Treatment effects on days to flowering were generally directly proportional to effects on yield parameters.The present results suggest that occasional instances of premature flowering in jute, even though daylength during growth had been adequate, cannot be explained by temperature effects. Thus effects of light intensity or quality may be involved. Further, it is suggested that screening of genotypes for optimum flowering requirements (long vegetative period) may be done on the basis of photoperiod response alone, due to the relatively small effects of other environmental factors on flowering

publication date

  • 1985